Category Archives: Veggie Subscriptions (CSA)

scapes

Scape Gazpacho!

A few weeks ago, I got this recipe from Ellie Costello, owner of Black Bear Soups (which you will find at the Clark Fork Farmers’ Market), director over at MUD, and former PEAS Farm caretaker. I wouldn’t be surprised if some of you still had scapes hanging out in your fridge, so I thought having another scape recipe would be a good idea. . . So here’s Ellie with a new twist on gazpacho–great for hot weather! 
Ellie and a scapeDuring scape season, some folks are loading up from my stand in bulk to make pickles. In far greater number, I get questions while a market-goer eyes my pile of green curly-cues. Most often: “Are those beans?” or, “How do you use them?” During my time at the PEAS farm several years ago, one visiting cattle rancher pointed at the garlic scapes shooting out of the tops of the hardneck garlic and shockingly proclaimed “Now what kind of corn is that!?”
Since scapes are short lived, you must capitalize on their sweet garlicky goodness. Here is one more way to highlight these mysterious and dramatic green curls: Garlic Scape Gazpacho.
You’ll need:Black Bear market stand
1 cup dry bread in chunks
1.5 cups cold water
1 cup of your choice of nuts
1/2 t. salt
1/4 cup olive oil
3 cups chopped lettuce leaves
1 cup chopped spinach
1 cucumber chopped
4-8 chopped garlic scapes
3 tablespoons of your choice of fresh herbs
2 tablespoons sherry or apple cider vinegar
How to:
Soak the bread in water, then squeeze most of it out. Blend your soggy bread, nuts, scapes, and 1 cup water in a food processor. Once a paste has formed, drizzle in olive oil as you blend, then transfer to a bowl. Put the lettuce, spinach, cucumber, and herbs in the food processor and blend with remaining 1/2 cup water. Whisk the puree and the sherry or vinegar into the bread mixture. Add salt and pepper as you like it.
greens

Love Your Greens & Your Farmer

It’s the most wonderful time of the year! When many greens are growing, hearts are glowing (with health and wellness that comes with eating your greens!) and loved ones are near. I know making food certainly brings more people to the table. Everyone eats, after all.

One of those people who you will be getting to know and love over the coming months is your farmer. Here at Garden City Harvest we don’t deliver your CSA for one very good reason. We want people to come to the farm, we want to see you, we want your kids to come see where their carrots and cukes are grown. We want to cultivate community in and between our shareholders. We really like you. Farming is better when you are around (and yes, I totally stole that line from Annie of the Pea Green Boat).

Farmer Greg
Photo by Erika Peterman

That said, I wanted to talk a little about Greg, who is the head farmer at River Road Farm. If you ask Greg to describe himself in 3 words, he’ll tell you: committed, organized, hardworking. He might roll his eyes at you, cause really, how can you boil someone down to 4 words?

He told me, “I try to stick with the simple things. Otherwise, you lose track of the important things.” For Greg, the simple things are food, wild places, and basketball.

When he was growing up, it was mostly him, his mom, and his brother. They moved around quite a bit, but the place Greg identifies with the most was Maryland. That’s where his grandparents lived, where he learned to fish and to hunt. He’s had a diversity of experiences throughout his life. Early in life, he joined the Air Force and was stationed in Germany. Later, he got a degree in philosophy. He started working for Garden City Harvest in 1997, and learned the art of farming as the organization grew. He has used his strong commitment and wondering mind to guide him in his life choices, “My studies in philosophy set me up especially for a kind of concentrated wondering.”

He has spent a great deal of time in the wild places of Montana. He worked for the Great Bear Foundation, alongside his work in the farm fields. I’ve seen him off to gather dandelion greens and other wild edibles for a Great Bear feast from the forest. He dreams of bringing more wild to the farm in the form of native plants, better animal and insect habitat and the like.

Greg fixes tool
Photo by Erika Peterman

He keeps stacks of wood for animals and insects to live in, he gets to know the many spiders on the farm. He’s planning to put a osprey nesting platform up at the farm in the coming year.

He has worked with the Poverello Center since he started with River Road, and grows about 5,000 annually for their soup kitchen. He also helps the chef at the Poverello understand how to use all of this food. I’ve always loved a story he told me about one of the first seasons he grew food for the Poverello. It was the fall, and Greg dropped off a load of winter squash. When he returned the next week, there was all the beautiful squash decorating the tables. Greg suggested that the squash was great decoration, but that the chef might want to cook with it, too. And they made a simple squash soup. Soon after, the soup became a staple on the fall menu. It takes more than growing the food to get it on the table. It is the simple things that make translating that squash into soup that fills your belly. The human connection.

In that spirit, I want to share some greens recipes with you. For this is a time to cherish, rather than feel overwhelmed. Also, in the spirit of knowing your farmer, ask yours what he or she likes to do with the greens. Our farmers have inspired me to try something knew so very many times.

In the coming weeks, greens are the thing. And take heart, they cook down to almost nothing. They are pretty interchangeable. And they are great for breakfast with eggs, lunch with toppings, and dinner as a side or a cooked bed for whatever else you are making. Here’s a great recipe for greens from a past blog :

Welcome, and welcome back! See you next week.

 

IMG_5077

Broth: not just for the tummy troubles

It is the dead of winter. There’s no more figgy pudding, the stored vegetable stores are starting to run low, and the light is still in short supply. I got fed up with my snow boots the last week and braved the snow in clogs. Winter be damned! Somehow, this was my rebellion against the endless layers and tense muscles that old man winter demands.

All I got was wet feet.

It’s times like this that require a little broth. There are many benefits to a cup of bone broth, including some protein,  gelatin, and glycine (the last two are good for your gut!). It’s a great thing to drink daily. Even if you don’t care a fig about the nutritional benefits, bone broth is a building block for so many recipes, that having it on hand is so handy. Buying it is expensive, and it is easy and quick to make at home. Plus, it saves you some bones! It will certainly make your day a little warmer, and that’s really saying something.

The difference between stock, broth and bone broth:

Broth — Broth cooks 45 minutes to two hours and usually uses meat, and perhaps some bones. The flavor is light, and it is generally not drunk on its own but instead used as a building block.

Stock — Stock and bone broth are similar in their ingredient lists, but differ greatly in the time they are cooked. They both always include bones, according to the definition, however a stock is typically cooked three to four hours and bone broth typically 12 – 24 hours. A note on vegetable stock: essentially, vegetable stock and vegetable broth are the same. The difference is how you use them in the end. (Will it be an ingredient of a larger dish? Stock. Will it be drunk on its own? Broth. )

Bone broth — Bone broth is always cooked with bones, and cooked for a long time (12 – 24+ hours). Some add vegetables, some do not.

Where to get bones:

Direct from the farmer (Lifeline Farm, Jamie’s Naturally Raised Grass Finished Beef, Oxbow Cattle Company, Manix Family Grass Finished Beef. . . Check out AERO’s Abundant Montana directory) — try the winter and summer farmers’ markets in Missoula, too. You can get a large amount and freeze them. You’ll need around 2 lbs of bones per 64 oz batch.

At a local natural food store –if you don’t see them on display, ask the meat department if they have any soup bones you could purchase. They’re usually very cost-effective.

You can keep a bone bag in the freezer, and put your chicken carcasses, ham hocks and other pork bones, and beef bones in there until you are ready to make some stock. A mixture of bones gives a wider flavor profile.

Make it without wasting all those veggies!

You can make bone broth without any vegetables (well, you always use the garlic). However, if you want the flavor vegetables offer, just start collecting your vegetable scraps. I’ve recently started keeping a bag in my freezer for my vegetable scraps. Any time I prepare a meal, I put the discarded ends and peelings, etc. in the bag for my next broth making venture.

Vegetables to keep — the basic aromatics are what I typically use (carrots, onions, celery) — they give a good base to work from. However, once I started staving scraps, root vegetables, stalks, leaves, tops, ends, peelings. Kale and chard stems, bell pepper cores, green beans/string beans, mushroom stems, herb stems. I put the garlic and onion skins in, though I’ve read that onions skins, along with beets, will turn your broth dark brown, so it’s more of a cosmetic thing. If you have some veggies that are about to turn (but haven’t yet) or are a bit dehydrated, this is a great use for them!

Vegetables to send packing — cabbage, broccoli, cauliflower, Brussels sprouts, (all from the brassica family, which has a certain odor you don’t want in your stock/broth), turnips and rutabagas (those are two roots to avoid). And of course, rotten spots and moldy veggies are also not a good idea.

How to make it

I prefer to make bone broth in my slow cooker. It is an Instant Pot so it can hold up to 64 oz, which is key for this recipe. If you are in the market, I can’t say enough about this one, it’s made of safe, stainless steel, it’s big, and can pressure cook, make yogurt, and rice. Anyway.

This makes 4 full quart sized mason jars.

Mason Jars

I got the bones (I used beef bones this time) and vegetables scraps out of the freezer, and dumped them in.

my ingredients

On top, I poured the apple cider vinegar and salt. I added a whole head of garlic, just smashing each clove between my knife and the cutting board before adding. I poured water to the max fill line in the slow cooker.

bone broth ready to boil

 

After that, all I had to do was stick the lid on, and put it on high until it came to a boil. Then, I turned it to low, and cooked it for 12 hours.

Here’s the beautiful elixir:

IMG_5077

Other notes:

set your slow cooker for 12 hours

Cooking time: Some say the vegetables will become bitter if you cook them longer than 12 hours. The longer you cook the broth, however, the better for you it gets. I often cook it for 24 hours without a problem, but if you are concerned about bitter broth, just scoop out the vegetables at the 12 hour mark and keep on cooking. Or skip the vegetables and just use water, vinegar, bones, salt and garlic (that doesn’t get bitter). You can also check doneness by taste and smell. This batch tasted perfect at 12 hours, so I didn’t have to worry. You know you’ve gotten all the nutrients out of the bones when they are starting to crumble at the edges.

Stovetop or oven: You can also do this on the stove top or in the oven. You want to bring it to a boil, then reduce the heat so that it is simmering in such a way that a tiny bubble trickles up every few seconds. Same cooking time (12 – 24 hours). For the oven, bring to a boil on the stove, then place in a 200 degree oven.

Storage: You can keep it in the fridge for 4-5 days, then it’s time to freeze. I like to either freeze in an ice cube tray or small baggies. Remember to label the baggies so you know how many cups are enclosed, and when you made it.

Roasting the bones for flavor: This is a great idea if you have time and want to bring out a richness in the bone broth, but easily skipped for simplicity. Coat the bones in a high heat oil (I usually use a solid fat like lard, bacon grease, or duck fat) and distribute them in a roasting pan. Roast at 400 degrees for around an hour.

To drink on its own: add your favorite herbs (fresh or dried), or just a little garlic and salt.

Recipe

This recipe is designed to make 64 oz of broth. Make sure your soup pot or slow cooker has the capacity. 

Ingredients:
  • Whole head of garlic, broken apart and each clove smashed (leave skin on)
  • 1.5 – 2 lbs stock bones (can use chicken, beef, or pork bones)
  • Vegetable scraps (optional)
  • Bay leaf (optional)
  • 1/3 cup apple cider vinegar
  • 2 teaspoons salt
  • Water
How to:

Combine the bones, vegetable scraps, and bay leaf. Pour the salt and apple cider vinegar over the top. Add water until you reach the max fill line in your slow cooker or soup pot.

Bring the water to a boil, then cook it for 12 – 24 hours. The longer the better. Remove or skip the vegetable scraps if you cook it longer than 12 hours. Let cool and refrigerate or freeze.

If this bone broth doesn’t do it for you, then try this quick video. There are places in Alaska where they only get minutes or an hour of sunlight some parts of the year. And start garden dreaming: sign up for a community garden plot or CSA share!

 

 

tomatoes

Tomato Pie: your savory savior for a quick fresh meal

Claire Vergobbi Clare Vergobbi is one of our apprentices this season, working at River Road Neighborhood Farm for the summer. She is an essential part of what we do there, each day, and in turn, we are teaching her many skills for her future. Simultaneously, she is studying at the University of Montana. Thanks to Missoula Federal Credit Union for making two of our apprenticeships possible. Here’s Clare on tomato pie:

There’s nothing quite like hand feeding a chicken, pulling up a handful of carrots you seeded, weeded, and hand-watered for two months, or watching the sun set over mountains while the farm is full of families picking up their vegetables for the week.

These are the simple lessons good soil, clean water, hard work, and fresh food can teach. I’ve spent the last two summers as an apprentice at River Road Neighborhood Farm, one of Garden City Harvest’s four farms, where I’ve been learning by doing. River Road grows food for over 80 households who are members of the farm, and helps stock the kitchen at the Poverello with food each week of the season.

That brings me to tomato season. At long last, it arrived—albeit about a month later than usual and much lighter than the motherlode that blessed gardens and farms around Missoula last year.

That brings me to tomato season.  At long last, it’s here—albeit a month later than usual and much lighter than the motherlode that blessed gardens and farms around Missoula last year.  I spent most of the winter and spring eating the tomato soup, sauce, salsa, and frozen fruits I preserved last fall, and most of the summer waiting for tomatoes to come back into season. Desperate for tomatoes, I  started making a list of everything I wanted to make out of them this year at the first hint of red on the vines at the beginning of August.

tomato

I work as an apprentice at River Road Neighborhood Farm. Working alongside Greg Price and

Unfortunately, it’s hard to outsmart the whims of nature and August and September have been colder and rainier than anyone would have liked—less than ideal weather for tomatoes.  Harvests of tomatoes, peppers, and other hot weather crops have been exercises in frustration at River Road for the past few months. However, harvests are finally topping out above 100 pounds and I have faith that we’ll all end up with enough tomatoes to have more than enough for preservation. The fleeting inconsistencies of this season reminded me that the best tomatoes are those enjoyed fresh off the vine, standing in the field with juice running down my fingers or starring as a primary flavor in a light dish.

sliced heirloomOne of the dishes on my tomato wish list this year is tomato pie, a recipe I came across in a few southern cooking websites last winter.  The version I made was also heavily inspired by an onion pie that my lovely coworker Samantha brought to work one day.  Tomato pie is an amazing way to showcase the deep flavors and beautiful colors of heirloom tomatoes—my favorites for this dish were Cherokee Purples and Golden Kings, but any large heirloom would be a good choice.  I opted for a slightly healthier version (minus the sour cream and mayonnaise) than the original recipes I came across; a combination of the onion pie recipe and a fantastic recipe for heirloom tomato pie I found on Dig This Chick, a local Missoula blog.

With a sunny week ahead of us, there’s still a chance to take advantage of the fresh tomatoes ripening in your gardens and on our farms.  Grab a bunch of romas for your soups and sauces and a few lumpy, beautiful heirlooms for this pie.

Heirloom Tomato Pie   tomato pie

Need:

  • 1 cup breadcrumbs
  • 3-4 sliced heirloom tomatoes
  • 4 cups shredded cheese—I liked parmesan, white cheddar, and gouda
  • 1 cup milk or plain yogurt
  • 1 egg
  • 1 small onion, thinly sliced
  • 4 cloves of garlic, diced or sliced
  • 1 teaspoon dried sage
  • 1 tablespoon chopped chives
  • ¼ cup diced fresh basil (or 1 tablespoon dried basil)
  • Salt and pepper

Preheat oven to 350 degrees.

For the crust, take a cup or so of breadcrumbs and mix with 3 tablespoons of melted butter, then press mixture firmly around the pie pan.

Caramelize onions and garlic.

Mix milk/yogurt, egg, cheese, garlic, onions, and herbs.  Pour mixture into pie crust.   Layer tomato slices to fill up remainder of pie pan, sprinkling with salt and pepper to taste as you go.

Bake for about an hour, or until the cheesy stuff is nice and bubbly and the tomatoes are juicy and squishy, but not dehydrated or burned.

When it comes out of the oven, it will still be pretty watery.  Let it sit for an hour at room temperature so it can set up, but it’ll probably taste just as good if you can’t wait that long.

Throw some extra fresh basil on top before eating to make it extra tasty.

Enjoy the remainder of glorious tomato season.  Who knows? If the frost holds off maybe we’ll have a fire sale after all.

 

3 Freezer Meals for the Cold Dark Nights Ahead

The nights are cooling off. The days are getting shorter. My little is back in school. It’s labor day weekend, again. As I put away my white pants and shoes (haha), I brush off my Carrot Cardamom Soup recipe from Michelle Tam and shine up my soup pot to make some of my favorite freezer meals for those times when we need a quick meal that reminds us summer is waiting for us in a few months. While this weekend I am heading to the Helmville Rodeo (a Montana institution), I will be making or have made many of these meals in the next few weeks.

1. The Soup: Carrot Cardamom Soup, by Michelle Tam

Austen eats carrot soup
There she is, loving on the carrots and cardamom!

I love this soup. What’s even better: my four year old Austen loves it too. It is a bowl full of carrots and apples and homemade bone broth. Nutrients abound. She has no idea. Moo ha ha ha.

When we’re talking soups and freezing them, however, what I often do while I have fresh carrots, celery, and onions, is make a mirepoix — a french term for the flavor base to many dishes — from a pan of beans to a meat skillet to a pot of soup. Because it is the base to so many dishes I make, having some frozen and on hand in the winter months saves time. So, if you don’t want to make the whole cha bang, just saute two parts onion, to one part carrots, and one part celery in a pan with your favorite cooking oil (butter is GREAT, bacon or duck fat work as do olive or coconut oil).

If I am feeling ambitious, I will cook the base, leaving out the apples and cardamom in case I get tired of this soup (it happens occasionally, but not often) and feel more like Curried Carrot Soup.

Or I’ll just go for it and make the recipe, cool it, and most importantly, put it a bag or mason jar that is the appropriate size for what my family would want in one sitting.

I once put all my carrot soup in gallon sized bags in the freezer. Two things happened: one, I put them on the door, and the bags leaned into the bar on the freezer door and froze, forever molded into place. One pinning the other in place as well. I think I had to break the bar to the the damn things out. It’s best to lay them out flat, let them freeze, and then stack them either like library books or in a big stack. Two, I had to thaw the whole bag to get about 1/3 of it for all of us to eat. Then I had to eat carrot soup for a week because I couldn’t bare to re-freeze it. Then, I didn’t want to see carrot soup for the rest of the winter. I use quart sized bags now.

2. The Main Event: Shepherd’s Pie by Elana’s Pantry

This is technically a cottage pie, because it is made with beef rather than lamb. However, it

Shepherds pie
That’s the shepherds pie I made — complete with creamy mashed cauliflower topping.

sneaks extra veggies (this one has a mirepoix base, too!) in the topping: it is made of cauliflower. You can use your lovely potatoes from this week too, if you’d prefer.

The last time I served this, we were hosting my 16 year old niece. She is a pretty typical teenager, sweet enough to eat anything I put in front of her, but only enthusiastic about a few things. This she loved. She was seen later in the evening spooning up the faux mashed potatoes and eating them all by themselves.

This makes a lot, so you could serve half and then freeze the other half. Make it soon! Cauliflower is on its way out.

3. Breakfast: Breakfast Cookies!

Seriously! Adapted by the Kitchn from 101 Cookbooks (two of my favorites)

Photo by the Kitchn
Photo by the Kitchn

These are filled with carrots and lots of other yummy dried fruits. The only sweetener is maple syrup. And they freeze beautifully. They are there for you when you are short on time and need breakfast. You can also freeze and put a cookie or two in a kid’s lunch when you are trying to stretch to the next grocery trip.

 

 

Midsummer Madness: a recipe roundup

KateCooper2009 (2)August. It’s August. And not just the beginning — it’s mid August. Bittersweet: I think that is the word for this month. The slow letting go of lots of sun, swimming holes, and unstructured days. Deep breath.

But we don’t have to say goodbye to vegetables too soon — we are just hitting the peak. From now until mid to late September our gardens and farms will be plumping up, ripening and sweetening our vegetables for your tables. This summer has been relatively cool, so tomatoes and eggplants and peppers may be slow, but the rest of the high summer veggies are coming on strong.

So pack it in while you can, friends.

Here are 9 recipes that make the most out of our last month of summer.

Summer Chicken Stew from BBC Good Food

This recipe has two steps. Really. It’s that easy. Great for a weeknight, has lots of seasonal veggies.

Vegetable Hakka Noodles (AKA Chow Mein) from Manjulas Kitchen

Simple sauce and noodle base that allows you to build whatever veggies you can in there. This recipe happens to include only veggies you’ll find in your CSA.

Mediterranean Cauliflower Couscous with roasted chickpeas from Andrea Bemis of The Kitchn

(hint: the cauliflower is riced, so it takes the place of the couscous — sneaky!).

Cauliflower couscous by The Kitchn.
Cauliflower couscous by The Kitchn.
Cauliflower Steaks from The Kitchn

Apparently, this is a thing. Popping up on restaurant menus all over the place. I didn’t know. But it sounds easy and amazing, so put it on your menu this week! Great for vegetarians and those looking to give the cauliflower main stage.

Zucchini with Chorizo and Lime from The Kitchn

An easy one pot meal. There’s a lot of parsley in my CSA, so I’d sub that in for the cilantro in this recipe, and maybe add a little coriander (since that’s the seed of the cilantro plant).

Green Bean Potato and Corn Salad from Love and Lemons
love and lemons green bean and potato salad
Love and Lemons’ green bean, potato & corn salad.

This could be a side, or add your favorite meat or seafood and make it dinner. It even has basil, which I have a lot of. Making this tonight!

Summer Squash Vegetable Pizza from Love and Lemons

What a great way to use up veggies: grab a Le Petit crust, roll it out, and load on the veggies and herbs and a little tomato sauce or olive oil. Done and done. This one from Love and Lemons is a great mixture of seasonal veggies.

Darla’s Delicious Frittata from Epicurious

I’ve starting making a frittata over the weekend when I have a bit more time and serving it for breakfast (or dinner) throughout the week. I recently read a frittata recipe that, instead of listing what vegetables, just said “vegetables.” As in, as long as you have some veggies, cheese, and maybe a little cream or meat (totally optional, though I do argue bacon is always a good idea) along with eggs, you’ll be good to go.

Easiest Refrigerator Pickles from Smitten Kitchen
easiest-fridge-dill-pickles1
Easy refrigerator pickles by Smitten Kitchen.

And a little nod to what’s coming down the pike: storing veggies. Pickling! Cucumbers, they are great for snacking, salading, and some great Greek food. But when in doubt, pickle them!

We’ll be taking a break next week. Because #peasfarmparty. Hope you all will join us for our 20th anniversary get down Thursday, August 18th.

I’ll be writing about going back to school (gasp!) next time around. Until then, eat well.

 

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kamut salad

Kamut® Salad: the newest addition to the Farm Party lineup

The Farm Party is in a little over a week from now. If you haven’t been, it is a big old party up at the PEAS Farm celebrating this great community, and the harvest that abounds this time of year. We cook everyone a big meal, and host some live music (Shakewell and Local Yokel this year!). It’s really fun. This year, we’re celebrating our 20th anniversary, which means we’ll have cake and a photo booth and a few other fun things.

One of the longstanding traditions around this party (we’ve been doing the party for 14 years, so we’ve got some serious traditions going) is that Josh (PEAS Farm Director) and the PEAS Farm student crew make the food. They harvest it in the fields, truck it over the First Presbyterian Church’s commercial grade kitchen, and get to work. The party has gotten so big that UM Catering has now taken over cooking the burgers, so we can focus on what’s most important: the veggies.

Chopping onions for Farm Party
Chopping onions for the Farm Party Kamut Salad. Real chefs wear onion eye protection. Photo by Tom Bauer/The Missoulian

This wonderful group makes six salads (green salad, cole slaw, carrot, cuke, roasted beet, and Kamut Brand Khorasan Wheat). It’s a treat for them to show Missoula what they’ve been up to all summer. All their harvesting, weeding, moving pipe, tractoring, educating, more weeding, seeding and re-seeding, and harvesting again, and sweating and sometimes freezing — it all adds up to a rich and new experience. So it is a special thing to be able to invite all of you up to the farm to see a little piece of it in action.

In the spirit of sharing, I asked Kali, an EVST grad student who is one of the group’s leaders this year, if she’d share a recipe. She did some calculating (these recipes are sized for making food for around 1,000) to make it for around 6 servings, and gave me this year’s version of the Kamut® Salad recipe. Grain salads are great because you can stick all sorts of things in them and they taste great with a little dressing. This year, the crew is adding peaches (that’s right!) to the savory salad. It’s a great way tie many seasonal ingredients into one dish. Eat it as a meal, or as a hearty side. To make this gluten free, sub rice.

Recipe

Ingredients

Dressing
1/4 cup safflower oil or olive oil
1/8 cup red wine vinegar
A few sprigs of basil
1-2 tsp raw honey
Salt and pepper to taste
Salad
1 cup Kamut® berries, cooked and cooled (shorten the cooking time if you soak the berries overnight — see here for simple cooking instructions — mine cooked for almost 60 min)
3 – 5 kale leaves, stemmed and chopped
1/2 sweet onion, diced small
1-2 peaches, chopped
4 oz feta cheese, crumbled

Instructions

Prep all your ingredients.
Ingredients
Emulsify the dressing with an immersion blender.
immersion blender and dressing
Massage the chopped kale with a small amount of the dressing to tenderize it. Then combine all the ingredients in a bowl!
Combine together ingredients
We hope you’ll make this, and come to the Farm Party on August 18th, 5:30 pm at the PEAS Farm to try ours! Come find me and we’ll compare recipes, will you?

Cooking in the garden: How to eat fresh with kids

Amy HarveyAmy Harvey has served with Garden City Harvest and the Missoula County Public Schools for the last two years a FoodCorps service member. She has led our summer cooking in the school garden series A natural teacher who brings enthusiasm and an infectious love for local food, we are excited to have her tell us a bit about her time cooking with kids in a few school gardens.

As I wrap up my second year as a FoodCorps service member, I am lucky enough to conclude the term with one of my favorite series of events. In partnership with Garden City Harvest’s Farm to School program, our team leads family friendly cooking classes in the elementary school gardens of Missoula. Families join us to experience the garden during the bounty of summer, cook a fresh meal together, and eat as a school community.

Busy hands and smiles

Last week at Rattlesnake Elementary School, we had a record breaking 34 participants, including 20 adults and 14 kids. We started things off with a choose your own adventure Herbal Lemonade station and fresh veggies with homemade hummus. On the menu was Power Kale Salad, Spiralized Zucchini Salad, Mid-Summer’s Harvest Pasta, and Fresh Summer Rock n’ Rolls with a Peanut Dipping Sauce. As families arrived, we encouraged them to rotate between the four cooking stations to try out new cooking techniques. One of our FoodCorps sayings is to “try new things” and we sure did! We mashed garlic with a mortar and pestle, spiralized zucchini into thin ribbons, crinkle cut bell peppers, massaged kale in a Ziplock bag, and strategically rolled veggies up into rice wrappers. Throughout the class we taught the kids (and parents) a few simple rules to encourage cooking safety.

Here are our food safety basics:

Learning the basics of spiralizingClaw and Saw: Stabilize the item you are cutting by clawing your fingertips against the item and your cutting surface. Then, with your dominant hand, cut the item in a saw-like motion using your knife.

Hands and Eyes: To stay safe, always keep your hands and eyes focused on your current task.

Low and Slow: Keep tools low to the table and work slowly to stay in control.

Wait to Taste:To avoid spreading germs, wait to taste any food until you’re done cooking.

To watch toddlers, elementary school students, middle school students, parents, grandparents, and volunteers work together to create a communal meal is truly a special occasion. At any age cooking is a practice of patience and flexibility, especially with kids. Your salad dressing will never exactly follow the recipe, the chunks of onion in the pasta will vary from tiny to giant, and sometimes a spring roll just won’t work. However, it will be fun and taste delicious. The Rattlesnake Cooking Class was a huge success! The food was scrumptious, we strengthened our garden community, and we created a positive food memories for everyone there. Try making Summer Rock N’ Rolls (i.e. fresh spring rolls) at home tonight with your family.

Summer Rock n’ Rolls

adapted from City Blossoms- Garden Gastronomy’s cookbook 

Ingredients

for the spring rolls: SchoolGardenCookingClass_Rattlesnake_2016 (2)

  • Spring roll rice paper (one per person)
  • 1 cup rice noodles, cooked and cooled
  • 1 cup of carrot peelings
  • 1 cup of shredded cabbage
  • 1 cup of grated beets
  • 1 cup of grated kohlrabi
  • ½ cup finely chopped basil (as desired)
  • ½ cup finely chopped mint (as desired)
  • ½ cup finely chopped chives or green onions (as desired)
  • Other possible fillings: cucumber, bell pepper, avocado, zucchini, bean sprouts, lettuce, tofu, anything!

for the peanut dipping sauce

  • ¼ cup peanut butter
  • 2 tablespoons low sodium soy sauce or tamari
  • 1 clove of garlic, chopped
  • ¼ cup of warm water
  • 1 tablespoon of brown sugar
  • Juice from ½ a lime (more or less, depending on your taste)
  • Sprinkle of crushed red pepper or hot sauce (optional)
Directions
  1. Take a piece of rice paper and carefully dip it in lukewarm water for the count of 10. Try not to crack or fold the paper; it is delicate!
  2. Place the wet rice paper on a sheet of wax paper. It may seem a little stiff, but will continue to soften.
  3. Lay down a few carrot peels, a few slices of cabbage, and a pinch of grated beets and kohlrabi together in the center of the rice paper.
  4. On top, add a pinch of herbs (basil, mint, chives) as you desire. All of the filling should be facing the same direction and in a little mound in the center.
  5. Then, put a large pinch of noodles on top of the vegetables, but not so big that you can’t close the roll.
  6. Here’s the tricky part. Fold the left end of the rice paper over the pile of noodles. Then repeat with the right side and bottom (edge closest to you). Finally, roll the whole thing towards the top to wrap it like a burrito. A little practice is required, but even if you are not perfect, it will still be delicious!
  7. To make the peanut sauce, combine all ingredients in a non-stick pan. At low heat, stir constantly until peanut butter has melted and it is well mixed.
  8. Dip your fresh spring rolls in the peanut sauce and enjoy!
Dinner is Served
Dinner is served! The feast from the garden is ready to eat.

How to Prevent the Zucchini Apocalypse, Part 1

It is that time of year when the vegetable stars align to give us an abundance of possibilities.

zucchini apocalypse
Beware the zucchini apocalypse! Graphic by Ken Lockwood.

It is also the time of year when desperate gardeners start slipping zucchinis into unlocked cars. If you find yourself at either end of this situation, I’ve got a great recipe for you. It will take care of 4 – 6 zucchinis, and a few other things that are just coming into season right now.

Want more zucchini ideas to ward of that sense of impending doom? We’ve got a collection just for you.

Now, you can use a regular peeler for this recipe, but I would recommend either springing for a spiralizer (takes up a bit more space in your kitchen, so its a bit more of a commitment) or a julienne peeler. I recommend either the Swissmar or Kuhn peelers if you purchase online. The only place I could find that sold them locally was the Good Food Store.

In the summer, we eat a lot of zucchini pasta at my house. It is is my #1 defense against the zucchini apocalypse. And a great way to replace a grain with a vegetable. And trick my unsupsecting child and husband. They’ve figured it out by now, but I can blend pasta and z-pasta together and they are pretty darn happy.

This salad is so simple and so good. I am always surprised at how delicious raw zucchini and carrots taste with a bit of garlic,salt, and olive oil on them.

This is great on its own. You can add a few things to it if you are trying to purge your fridge. I added scallions to it cause I had such fresh, lovely ones today. I made it at the office, and decided it would be my lunch. I put some sliced turkey and ham on the side (and a plopped a little mayo on the side too, because I am a mayo freak). Great meal!

Other additions include mozzerella, tomatoes, chunks of bread. . . Sides of toast! I’m guessing a little spiralized kohlrabi wouldn’t be bad, either. Maybe olives? But I haven’t tried those yet.

Caprese SaladSummer Squash Caprese Noodle Salad

adapted from Diane Sanfilippo’s book, Practical Paleo

Ingredients:

Dressing:
  • 1/4 cup olive oil
  • 1/4 cup fresh basil (I’ve used dried in a pinch, just reduce by a 1/3rd (4 teaspoons)
  • 1 clove garlic, grated
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • Pepper to taste (I used white pepper, but black pepper is great too)
Salad:
  • around 5 cups spiralized or julienned zucchini or summer squash – I used 3 medium squash plus two of the patty pan
  • 1 medium carrot, julienned, peeled or spiralized (when tomatoes come into season, you can use those instead)
  • 1 scallion (optional)

How to:

I peeled my zucchini, the noodles just work better that way. But you certainly don’t have to. Spiralize or julienne peel your squashes. I spiralized mine, using the larger noodle setting. Set aside. If you want to get a bit of the water out of the zucchini beforehand, salt the zucchini noodles before you set them aside.

spiralized squash

Combine dressing ingredients in a large bowl.

dressing

Peel the carrots right into the bowl with dressing.

Carrots

If you opted to salt the squash, now’s the time to take a clean rag, towel, or paper towel and squeeze some of the water out into the sink. (I didn’t do this – I just don’t care enough about the slightly watery situation.)

Add the squash and toss with your hands. Grind a little fresh pepper on top. I added a few scallions here, too. Tastes great either way.

Eat right away, or stick in the fridge to let the flavors combine.

Bon appetit!

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Why Kohlrabi Should Be Your New Best (Farm) Friend

You might have met Bobbi Kohlrabi. She is a Garden City Harvest superhero, and knows the essential dance moves (funky chicken, mash potato, driving the big tractor, raise the barn roof, etc.).

This character was inspired by the amazing and nutritive powers of the spaceship-shaped, sparse-leaved, mineral and nutrient rich kohlrabi. It has the amazing absorption promoting combo of iron and calcium.  Iron can be hard to absorb, so this is something to shake your tail feathers over. Its got vitamins A, B complex, C, and K a ton of fiber to keep things moving smoothly, and antioxidant properties (thanks phytochemicals!).

Kohlrabi kid

Kohlrabi is crunchy, slightly sweet, a bit more like an apple in texture but a broccoli stem in taste. The flavor does well with the rich, complex spices in many Indian dishes. Many German recipes use kohlrabi as well.

And, my friends, it is so versatile. You can eat it raw, roasted, grilled, souped, stewed. . . even enchiladaed. Which is actually how I used my first kohlrabi. It can be subbed for carrots, broccoli, potatoes. Make kohlrabi fries! Slaws (recipe below)! Risottos! Its leaves can be used as you would kale or collards.

Our four farms grow purple and green kohlrabi varieties. There really isn’t much difference in the taste of the two, and they are both the same color once you peel them. Which brings me to the hardest part of working with your new BFF.

You have to peel this or you will think it is your worst enemy. The skin isn’t so bad, but the fibrous stuff just underneath the skin resembles tree bark. It does not soften with cooking.

Once peeled, you can match stick chop, mandoline slice, or grate in your food processor. The Kitchn has all sorts of tips on slicing and dicing your kohlrabi if you want to nerd out.

Many articles rave about kohlrabi slaw, which I have never made. So I decided it was time.

With no cooking required and a simple dressing, this recipe is easy and quick. Refreshing on a hot summer day, too.

I roughly followed this recipe from The Kitchn, with a few adjustments. Just enough that I am now calling it Bobbi Kohlrabi’s Super Slaw. Boom.

Peel your kohlrabbi, peel it good.

Peeling kohlrabi

Chop it to fit in your food processor. You can also hand grate any of these, and work on your muscle tone while you’re at it.

Feed two medium carrots and a half of one of your smaller beautiful fresh purple cabbages to the food processor (doesn’t have to be purple, but you get color points if it is!)

Chopping Kohlrabi, etc.

I fed a few of the baby onions I picked up at River Road to the food processor, too.

baby onions

All of the above ingredients are coming into or are in season right now. You shouldn’t have to buy anything special for this recipe.

I mixed the dressing. Since I only had fresh parsley (not cilantro, which is what the recipe calls for), I mixed in some cumin to give the slaw a little flair. You could also pair parsley with coriander to get closer to the cilantro flavor (coriander is made of the seed of the cilantro plant).  I was pleased with the half a teaspoon of cumin I added, however.  I also put one teaspoon of honey in, rather than two teaspoons of sugar. It was plenty sweet.

dressing

I put all the ingredients in a bowl, and used my (clean) hands to toss it all together.

Austen asked if it was made of different kinds of cheeses when she saw it. I hedged with “Yeah, it is. . . probably not made of cheese.” As she was tasting it. Then I admitted it was vegetables. She gave it the double thumbs up. But then she asked if she could only eat one bite.

two thumbs up from Austen

Next, I’m going to tackle kohlrabi french fries. . .

cole slawBobbi Kohlrabi Super Slaw

Serves 6 as a side

Ingredients
for the slaw:

1 medium large kohlrabi, peeled and shredded

2 medium large carrots (as fresh as you can get) shredded

half a small purple cabbage

3 – 5 baby onions

for the dressing:

1/3 cup mayo (I used Just Mayo)

1 1/2 tablespoons apple cider vinegar

1 teaspoon honey

1 1/2 teaspoons salt

1/2 teaspoon cumin or coriander

2 tablespoons parsley

1. Peel the outer layers of the kohlrabi. Chop to food processor size all ingredients. Shred the main ingredients in your food processor (or grate by hand — also great way to get in a arm workout).

2. Mix together dressing.

3. Combine and toss veggies and dressing. It’s best to cool this off after prepping it for a few hours in the fridge. Finish with a parsley garnish.